Flag Requests

Flag Order Form

If you would like to order a U.S. flag from my office, please use this flag order form to calculate the price and shipping costs.

You will have the option for printing the completed form for sending to my office with your check or ordering directly with a credit card.

You will also have the option to request the flags purchased to be flown over the Capitol.

Flag Flown Over The Capitol

Flags are flown daily year-round, weather permitting, excluding Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day and New Year's Day. There are special flag poles where all flags are flown. After it is flown over the Capitol, each flag is issued a keepsake Certificate of Authenticity by the Architect of the Capitol.

Care of the Flag

Most outdoor flags can be washed in mild detergent and thoroughly rinsed. Indoor and parade flags should be dry-cleaned. Damaged flags can be repaired and utilized as long as the overall dimensions are not noticeably altered. American Legion Posts and local governments often have facilities to dispose of unserviceable flags. Store your flag in a clean, well ventilated area.

The "Flag Code"

Previous to Flag Day, June 14, 1923 there were no federal or state regulations governing display of the United States Flag. It was on this date that the National Flag Code was adopted by the National Flag Conference which was attended by representatives of the Army and Navy which had evolved their own procedures, and some 66 other national groups. This purpose of providing guidance based on the Army and Navy procedures relating to display and associated questions about the U. S. Flag was adopted by all organizations in attendance.

A few minor changes were made a year later during the Flag Day 1924 Conference. It was not until June 22, 1942 that Congress passed a joint resolution which was amended on December 22, 1942 to become Public Law 829; Chapter 806, 77th Congress, 2nd session. Exact rules for use and display of the flag (36 U.S.C. 173-178) as well as associated sections (36 U.S.C. 171); and, conduct during the playing of the National Anthem, (36 U.S.C. 172), the Pledge of Allegiance to the Flag, and Manner of Delivery were included.

This code is the guide for all handling and display of the Stars and Stripes. It does not impose penalties for misuse of the United States Flag. That is left to the states and to the federal government for the District of Columbia. Each state has its own flag law.

California laws regarding the display and care of the US and state flag are located in California Code Section 430-439.

Criminal penalties for certain acts of desecration to the flag were contained in Title 18 of the United States Code prior to 1989. The Supreme Court decision in Texas v. Johnson; June 21, 1989, held the statute unconstitutional. This statute was amended when the Flag Protection Act of 1989 (Oct. 28, 1989) imposed a fine and/or up to I year in prison for knowingly mutilating, defacing, physically defiling, maintaining on the floor or trampling upon any flag of the United States. The Flag Protection Act of 1989 was struck down by the Supreme Court decision, United States vs. Eichman, decided on June 11, 1990.

While the Code empowers the President of the United States to alter, modify, repeal or prescribe additional rules regarding the Flag, no federal agency has the authority to issue 'official' rulings legally binding on civilians or civilian groups. Consequently, different interpretations of various provisions of the Code may continue to be made. The Flag Code may be fairly tested: 'No disrespect should be shown to the Flag of the United States of America.' Therefore, actions not specifically included in the Code may be deemed acceptable as long as proper respect is shown.

Federal Laws Related to the Display of the US Flag

In 2008, the non-partisan Congressional Research Service published a report for Congress entitled "The United States Flag: Federal Law Relating to Display and Associated Questions."

The report addresses several of the frequently asked questions concerning the flag. The subject matter of these questions includes the pledge of allegiance and the court decisions concerning it, the nature of the codifications of customs concerning the flag in the “Flag Code,” display of the flag 24 hours a day, flying the flag in bad weather, flying the flag at half-staff, ornaments on the flag, destruction of worn flags, display of the U.S. flag with flags of other nations or of States, commercial use of the flag, size and proportion of the flag, and restrictions upon display of the flag by real estate associations. 

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